Friday, January 1, 1971

Adam Weisweiler

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Adam Weisweiler
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A cabinetmaker born in the Rhineland, Weisweiler moved to Paris and set up shop at 67 rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine. He married in 1777 and obtained the title of master a year later. His luxury furniture was sold through the furniture dealers Daguerre and Julliot. He worked with Riesner and Beneman. His furniture is of outstanding quality: he used very little marquetry, preferring the play of dark veneers such as ebony and mahogany. His production primarily consisted of commodes with folding-joint doors, secretaires in the form of cabinets, furniture equipped with mechanical means of transformation, console tables and small pieces (such as pedestal tables with a support in bronze imitating bamboo). He manufactured furniture for the Crown such as the secretaire for the private office of Louis XVI at Versailles or the Japanese lacquer table for that of Marie-Antoinette at Saint-Cloud. Many museums have Weisweiler’s works—the Louvre, the Metropolitan Museum of Art—as do important collections such as the Wallace and that of the king of Sweden and the queen of England.