Friday, January 1, 1971

Tilliard Family

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Tilliard, Family
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Jean-Baptiste Tilliard (1685-1766), a skilful furniture maker, belonged to the family of journeymen in the trade, with several members representing the Parisian community around the beginning of the reigh of Louis XV. One of them, Nicolas Tillard, was established at Aux armes de France in Rue de Cléry, and was the head of the guild in 1741.
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During this this period, Jean-Baptiste, who lived in the same street, was in the service of the Crown as a joiner in ordinary to the Royal Furniture Repository. He supplied the supplied the royal residences with tables, consoles and numerous chiars in the sinuous shapes that were fashionable at the time. He remained as the head of his business, at least in name, until he was seventy-nine years old.
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Jacques-Jean-Baptiste or Jean-Baptiste II, the son of Jean-Baptiste, received his title as master on July 16th, 1752 but did not register it until April 1764 when he took over from his father, for who he had worked until then.
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With the assitanace of skilful artists, such as the sculptor Chaillon and the gilder Mathon, he made chairs of an excellent quality and original taste, decorated with characteristic motifs in the form of escutcheons and cartouches. He forged strong business relations ans was employed by the Court.
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As this master was able to live off his own incom, when the Revolution broke out he left his workshop to go and reside in Rue Beauregard where he died in 1797. 
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Comte François de Salverte, Les ébénistes du XVIIIe siècle, édition Nobele, Paris, 1962.